Jason Reynolds – CIO

Over the last four years, Stonebriar Community Church has blessed me with the chance to learn web design, agile project management, application development, and most importantly what the inside of a church is really like. I was given opportunity within Web Ministry when there was barely such a thing. For that I am very grateful and am forever changed.

But as I mentioned on my personal blog five days ago, I am returning to my roots in IT Management and going to work for a large church in West Palm Beach, Florida named Christ Fellowship. The role (not the title) will be CIO, with a focus on not just day to day management, but partnering with senior leadership on creating a technology plan that matches their vision for additional multi-campus growth in a region with over 1M lost souls. Palm Beach County, here I come. Christ Fellowship also has dreams of doing their own version of an Internet campus and allowing people to connect online. First up is to put a team together to redo their website in short order while we plan for a bigger web project.

I need to share at least three things that hooked me into believing this is a church who is ready to leverage Church IT.

  • During the interview process I met with the core leadership team, the directional leadership team members (five), the Executive Pastor, and the Head Pastor. This told me the role and technology itself is a priority for them.
  • When I met with the 60+ year old Head Pastor for an hour with my wife, he said:

    “We have 1,600 people watching our service online every weekend. That is a mega-church right there. We need an internet campus now!”

  • The leaders said they not only need change, but they require change from their staff. This was backed up by the fact they have leadership expert John Maxwell on staff as a teacher and ministry partner. Who isn’t changed by that guys stuff?

I could not be more humbled or more thrilled to be called to this exciting church and one amazing opportunity to do what God has crafted me to do. You can read more on my personal blog about what this means for my family. I am not yet sure what it means for this blog or my freelance business. This site may be going away as I focus in on my new role managing 8 people and playing with some really advanced technology I have not had my hands on in a few years now. In any case, I will be blogging somewhere about what I am doing and we’ll point you there as soon as I know. If you have any ideas, feel free to comment or skype me at verticalcashew. I know I am interested in being involved more with the Church IT RoundTable.

Posted in Web Ministry
6 comments on “Jason Reynolds – CIO
  1. Nathan Smith says:

    Congrats Jason. Gonna miss ya here in Dallas.

  2. I used to develop and manage the men’s ministry website for a rather large church here in Austin. I can’t begin to tell you how frustrating it is to be tasked with something like that, have a vision for where it could go and how it could help serve people, and then get no real backing from church leadership. I went through a 2 year-long cycle of getting fired up about where the web could take the men’s ministry, all the way down to being depressed about not getting any help, and then to soul-searching and prayer — asking God if I was the problem.

    I ended up abandoning the (volunteer) position, and eventually left the church for a lot of different reasons. The church I attend now is 1/10th of the size of my old one, but they are so much more hip to the power of the internet/blogs/podcasts/etc. Working with that web team has been invigorating and fun.

    I guess I said all that to say congratulations. Nothing is more powerful than people who share a vision and know how to accomplish it.

  3. Jason says:

    Thanks for the comment Damian. Funny enough, as a lay person at Stonebriar I worked with a volunteer team on a certain ministry’s needs for the web and the project failed miserably. It was very frustrating. I found that once I was on staff the support improved dramatically, but not completely. So, it took me another 2 years to get the momentum, buy-in, and interested parties to crank out the project you can now see on that site.

    The lessons learned for me in this are a-plenty, but one main one is that it doesn’t matter how web-educated the players are. What matters is how determined the team is to do something great, and how humble/flexible each of the participants is. One other piece is that great web sites cost money, and the church has to be willing to fork up the cash to build something. Church buildings aren’t free, and neither are virtual Church buildings. The project has to be properly funded and supported to do something really cool.

  4. Clif Guy says:

    Cool to hear you’re even more interested in the RoundTable. Any possibility you can come to Kansas City for the RoundTable Oct. 2-4? It would be awesome to have you here.

  5. Stuart D says:

    Jason, I’m new to your blog so excuse me if this is easily found.

    However, I’m just starting to undertake the project lead in designing our first Church website and I’d appreciate any tips, any feedback, any info, any links or even share any documents that you could on this topic.

    Having read your blog entry I am dreading being a lay person doing this in my own time!

    Cheers

  6. Jason says:

    Stuart, I started to reply to your comment, but my quicklist of advice grew into a post. Will publish shortly.

2 Pings/Trackbacks for "Jason Reynolds – CIO"
  1. [...] was kind enough to post a comment asking for helpful hints for building a web site as a lay person. My comment grew larger than the [...]

  2. [...] and interfacing with executives, and that means my focus is shifting in life and in technology. This is a great move for me, but I am realizing I never really accomplished what I wanted to with this [...]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>